Social Media Marketing Tips






Social Media Marketing Tips


Attract Leads With Facebook Offers

Facebook Offers are a type of Facebook ad, but they work a bit differently than a traditional Facebook Ad. You can set them up directly from your Facebook Page (no need to go into the Ads dashboard) and they can be created for offline and online businesses.

Here’s why they work:
  1. Offers are promoted in the news feed (as opposed to being placed in the right-hand column on Facebook where you usually see marketplace ads).
  2. Ads in the news feed can get up to six times more engagement than ads in the right-hand column on Facebook.
  3. You can hyper-target your Offers to ensure that only the Facebook users who will have a genuine interest in your brand see them.
  4. When a user clicks on your Offer in the news feed, Facebook sends that user an email to their personal email account outside of Facebook. That means that your Offer is not only seen on Facebook, but now you are getting into the email boxes of interested prospects.
  5. When prospects open their email, they will see a link to your website or an opt-in page (wherever you choose to send people to claim your offer).
See how powerful Facebook Offers can be? Not only do you get optimal exposure in the news feed, you also get into personal email boxes and you can hyper-target each Offer. The way I see it, Facebook Offers are a triple threat!



Identify Your Outcomes

ric dragon
Ric Dragon
When we talk about the best thing to do in social media marketing for any given business, we have to begin with what that business is trying to achieve—its “desired outcomes.”
The best thing for a manufacturer of underarm deodorant is likely to be something quite different from what might be best for a company that tests those same products.
Before you go jumping into one platform or another, imagine what it would require for you or the company to go out and buy a $1,000 bottle of champagne and share it with the team. That’s your “1K Champagne Result.”

The next part of the puzzle is to understand that not all social media efforts are the same. There are some really big differences in approaches, and thus outcomes. The five big approaches are:

  • Brand maintenance—monitor your channels and respond when appropriate, and perhaps post a bit here and there.
  • Community-building—whether it’s internal advocates, external brand ambassadors or groups of people who share the underlying passions of the brand, in this work you endeavor to join and nurture community.
  • Influencer outreach—identify and engage the people who are influential around your passion points or industry.
  • Reputation management and development—the project wherein you eitherrepair or develop thought leadership or positive reputation.
  • The big splash—these are the big creative campaigns that garner a lot of short-term attention.

You might very well decide on a mix of these five approaches. If you start by thinking about your 1K Champagne Results, you can more easily line up your big approaches with whatever it is that’s going to make that cork go flying across the room.

Ric Dragon, co-founder and CEO of DragonSearch, author of Social Marketology and DragonSearch Online Marketing Manual.


Like Your Customers on Facebook

mitch joel
Mitch Joel
Instead of asking your consumers to like your brand on Facebook, why don’t you start liking them?
Most brands use Facebook as an extension of their traditional and mass-marketing initiatives. As such, we have what can only be described as an “arms race” for likes on Facebook.
The average person on Facebook has 120-200 connections (depending on whom you ask… and when).

As big as Facebook is, it’s actually many, many, very small circles of close (and semi-close) connections.

Facebook and brands are less about advertising and much more about creating, nurturing and developing a more direct relationship between individuals and the brands that serve them. This isn’t for all brands. This isn’t for all consumers. This is (still) a massive opportunity for those who can rise above a traditional advertising strategy.

Mitch Joel, president of Twist Image, blogger and podcaster, author of Six Pixels of Separation and the forthcoming book CRTL ALT Delete.



Secure Your Brand and Product Names


justin levy
Justin Levy
Whether you’re taking baby steps into social media or have jumped in with both feet, it’s critical that you secure your brand and product names on all major social media channels. This is as important as the domain name you choose for your company.
Too often companies will tweak or completely change the name of their company to fit an available domain name but they don’t treat social media channels the same way.
Even if you’re not ready to launch an active presence yet, at least secure your company handles on social networks such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, SlideShare, Flickr, Instagram and others.
Ideally your company handle will be consistent across all social media channels (e.g., @yourcompanyname), because once you start setting up variations on different channels, it makes it more difficult for your prospects, customers and fans to find you.
To that end, take a few minutes to set up minimal branding such as adding your company logo, website and bio information. Once you’ve completed this exercise, it becomes easier to just secure your company name on the new shiny social network of the month.
However, initially you may consider using a service such as KnowEm which allows you to easily search across 550 social networks. KnowEm even has premium packages available where they will take care of complete signup of all profile info, thus making it even easier for you.
Justin Levy, strategic advisor on all social media activities at Citrix Online, editor-in-chief of Workshifting.




Create Your Voice

neal schaffer
Neal Schaffer
Of all the companies I consult with, the one social media marketing tip that is always part of my advice is the importance of blogging.
Creating a social media presence and engaging with both consumers and potential clients requires companies to have a “voice” and to be able to share something of value in social media communities.
A blog is a perfect place to establish that “voice,” and it also serves as a logical vehicle to help both seed conversations in social media and help lead those same social media users back to your own website.
Simply being active in social media helps attain brand awareness, but when a user comes back to your website, it gives you a higher probability of converting them into a customer.
Obviously, providing unique content means that you can reap the potential benefit of that content being shared in social media, helping to expose your brand and website to more potential customers.
It’s also a logical boost for your search engine optimization. Some have claimed that with the advent of social media, blogging is dying. I believe that blogging is more important than ever before, and those who blog relevant and shareable content for their social media communities will continue to reap the benefits.
To build upon this tip, the keys to successful blogging are being able to create content that others would want to share (“shareable content”) and also create a content strategy for your blog that is aligned with your marketing goals.
Start with organizing content into “buckets” of categories that are aligned with your present sales or future marketing plans. If you can organize these categories into four “buckets” of content, blog once a week for each category and you’re on your way to becoming successful at business blogging.
Neal Schaffer, president of Windmills Marketing, author of Maximizing LinkedIn for Sales and Social Media Marketing, Understanding, Leveraging and Maximizing LinkedIn, and the forthcoming Maximizing Twitter for Business.