‘Girls Trip’ Matters Celebrates Black Sisterhood On Screen.

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Girls Trip has reportedly pulled in about $30.4 million domestically and it cost just under $20 million to produce it. This makes Girls Trip the Largest Opening Weekend in a Action Comedy so far in 2017. 

Queen Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith, Regina Hall and Tiffany Haddish pack their bags and head to New Orleans for a fun getaway in “Girls Trip,” a new summer movie released in theaters on Friday. The film follows these four women, each with distinct personalities and different lifestyles, as they reunite for an adventurous weekend that comes with almost as many regrets as winning moments.
“Girls Trip,” doesn’t just deliver on its laugh-out-loud scenes, but also carries resounding messages about black women engaging in self-care and sisterhood, something Hollywood has not always embraced ― but should.
What makes “Girls Trip” so great is that it shows black women as they are: Unapologetic, carefree, flawed and human. 
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“There’s a complexity to the imagery of black women,” Packer said during a recent panel discussion on the movie. “Black women, historically in media, have been either over-sexualized, hyper-angry, or super saintly. Those aren’t real people, those are caricatures. The opportunity to show real people ... was important.”
“Girls Trip” is set at the Essence Festival, a cultural event designed for and by black women. The festival, which promotes sisterhood and solidarity, serves as the perfect setting for the four women to absorb new experiences, meet new people and make new memories. 
Haddish reiterated the same sentiment, telling HuffPost that her role was a “dream come true” and that she is grateful to be able “to display real friendship and real sisterhood.”
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At its core, “Girls Trip” truly serves as a film that embraces and celebrates this sense of sisterhood. Together, Hall, Latifah, Pinkett-Smith and Haddish are breaking the mold around how black women are represented on the big screen and showing how multidimensional and carefree we can be. 
“We really wanted to show that there’s a lot of love and support and connection between us,” Hall said of her cast mates and the film. “We are enlightening and encouraging and helping each other evolve every day.”