To Collect A $560 Million Lotto Jackpot All Jane Doe Has To Do Is Make Her Name Public. She Refuses To Do So.






Jane Doe, the winner of last month’s New Hampshire $560 million Powerball lottery, would soon be the world’s newest Multi-Millionaire.
But because of lottery rules, everyone in the world would know about it including neighbors, old high school friends, con artists, criminals.
Now the woman is asking a judge to let her keep the cash and remain anonymous.
The case will be heard in a New Hampshire court on Tuesday, according to the New Hampshire Union Leader. Every day it remains unresolved, the lottery winner loses about $14,000 in interest. The total amount lost since the winning numbers were picked on Jan. 6 is quickly approaching $500,000 dollars.




In court documents obtained by NewHampshire.com, the plaintiff is fittingly identified only as Jane Doe.
“She is a longtime resident of New Hampshire and is an engaged community member,” the woman’s attorney, Steven Gordon, wrote in court documents. “She wishes to continue this work and the freedom to walk into a grocery store or attend public events without being known or targeted as the winner of a half-billion dollars.”
On one side of the case are lottery officials who say the integrity of the games depends on the public identification of winners as a protection against fraud and malfeasance. A local woman holding up a giant check while cameras flash and reporters scrawl also happens to be a powerful marketing tool.



The law doesn’t appear to be on her side.
New Hampshire lottery rules require the winner’s name, town and amount won be available for public information, in accordance with open-records laws.




The state allows people to form an anonymous trust, NewHampshire.com reported, but it’s a moot point for the woman — she signed her name on the back of the ticket shortly after winning, and altering the signature would nullify the ticket.
In court documents, the lottery winner asked a judge to allow the lottery winnings to be paid to a designated trust that keeps her anonymous. But lottery officials have argued that even if the cash goes into a trust, the ticket will have to be submitted in its original form — complete with the ticket buyer’s name and home town.
“In my experience, the publication of these individuals’ identities often leads to disastrous outcomes, including theft, ransom and harassment,” wrote David Desmarais, a certified public accountant, in court documents obtained by the Union Leader newspaper.
“Many clients are forced to hire professional security teams to accompany their children on trips out of the country,” he added. “The dangers of having their identities publicized can force these high-wealth individuals to leave their communities permanently, change their identities, go into hiding and maintain around the clock security.”